Someone Else's Stuff
Not in any particular order
Someone Else's Stuff
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black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.
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wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
wocinsolidarity:

odinsblog:

#myNYPD

the OOP heard around the world
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"To say, “I was triggered” is not to say, as it is frequently mischaracterized, “I got my delicate fee-fees hurt.” It is to say, “I had a significantly mood-altering experience of anxiety.” Someone who is triggered may experience anything from a brief moment of dizziness, to a shortness of breath and a racing pulse, to a full-blown panic attack. Speaking about trigger warnings as though they exist for the purposes of indulging fragile sensibilities fundamentally misses their purpose: To mitigate harm."
Shakesville: Triggered (via garlic-knot)
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"‘You don’t actually get over things… you incorporate them. They become part of everything you are. I don’t mean that you walk about crying all the time. But you change.’"
When You’re Falling, Dive: Lessons in the Art of Living, by Mark Matousek  (via moonsads)
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The Lady Of Cao || Female Rulers of the Ancient World 
La Dama de Cao or Lady of Cao was an enigmatic female ruler who reigned over one of the most important pre-Incan civilizations on the north coast of Peru: The Moche. Centuries ago in the Sechura Desert of northern Peru — one of the most arid and brutal environments on our planet — the Moche people developed an equally brutal culture where women, or more precisely priestesses, acted as queens.  One of these women was the Lady of Cao, who reigned over the Moche approximately 1,600 years ago. At the time of her tomb’s discovery, her mummified body was found surrounded by military artifacts — including war clubs and spear throwers that were usually reserved for powerful men — and ornaments made of gold, silver, turquoise and other precious metals. The unusual mix of ornamental and military artifacts confirmed that she was a figure of extreme importance to the Moche people and second only to the gods.  It is now known that the Lady of Cao died while giving birth when she was between the ages of 25 and 30 and her body was so well preserved that today it is still possible to observe the complex tattoos that cover her arms, ankles and fingers.
SCOTUS upholds affirmative action ban
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museedart:

Truth Coming Out of Her Well to Shame Mankind, 1896 by Jean-Léon Gérôme
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pizza:

bestofnowyoukno:

nowyoukno:

13 Hypnotizing “How It’s Made” GIFs That I Cannot. Stop. Watching.



oh my god these are so good
pizza:

bestofnowyoukno:

nowyoukno:

13 Hypnotizing “How It’s Made” GIFs That I Cannot. Stop. Watching.



oh my god these are so good
pizza:

bestofnowyoukno:

nowyoukno:

13 Hypnotizing “How It’s Made” GIFs That I Cannot. Stop. Watching.



oh my god these are so good
pizza:

bestofnowyoukno:

nowyoukno:

13 Hypnotizing “How It’s Made” GIFs That I Cannot. Stop. Watching.



oh my god these are so good
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oystermag:

Big Ideas: With Lily Cole
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simulated:

It’s like being in love: giving somebody the power to hurt you and trusting (or hoping) they won’t.
Marina Abramović, Rest Energy
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queerfabulousmermaid:

I want this on a shirt
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